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    User NameKokovin Dmitry
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    User Last Activity2009-02-13T10:36:04
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    Yellowknife Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:15
    During the International Geophysical Year (IGY) an observatory was in operation at Yellowknife A (July, 1957 to August, 1958) on a site about 2 km from the town and on the south side of the airport road. This site is no longer available.

    The decision was made in 1972 to re-establish a magnetic observatory in Yellowknife, N.W.T. In May, 1973 an area in the vicinity of the Seismology Laboratory was investigated for the location of a new magnetic observatory. The site is approximately 6 km northwest of the IGY observatory and is underlain by Archaean gneissic rocks. Two sites were found which were considered suitable: a 185 m square of land lying between the seismic vault and Long Lake, and a site on the south border of the Seismology Laboratory, 198 m above sea level and 390 m south of Long Lake. The first lot was considered more desirable in that the magnetic sensors could be located at greater distance from potential sources of artificial magnetic disturbance. However, it later transpired that the Government of the Northwest Territories had reserved this land as a recreational area for the town of Yellowknife. Accordingly the magnetic observatory was located on the second site, which was approximately 100 m from the Territorial Government Highways Department lot to the east, the golf course parking lot to the west, and the Mackenzie Highway to the south, and 60 m south of the chainlink fence surrounding the Seismology Laboratory. The average total force gradient measured for the site was 5 nT/m, comparable to that observed previously at the IGY site.

    To protect the magnetic environment of the observatory, an aluminum fence was built along the boundary with the Highways Department lot and from this boundary west to the fence along the north end of the Seismology Laboratory compound.

    The building, 6 m by 12 m, was of the same construction as Resolute Bay, Cambridge Bay and Baker Lake observatories. The long axis of the building was oriented geographic east-west. All materials used were non-magnetic. Individual piers were eliminated by the use of a reinforced insulated concrete slab isolated from the walls of the building.

    By 1986 the site began to experience considerable magnetic interference from heavy road servicing equipment which was occasionally parked in the Department of Highways compound and the from the parking of automobiles for the golf course. As a result, another site was selected which is 170 m west of the new Seismic complex and 100 m south of the Seismic vault. The site is visible from the Geodetic Tripod Bench Mark 39086 which in turn is visible from the Geodetic marker 629102. Accurate geodetic azimuths are then available to the new observatory.

    The new observatory, approximately 1 km to the northwest of the previous site, consists of two buildings, each 4.8 m by 2.4 m of non-magnetic construction, and various sensor shelters with dimensions as required. Each construct rests on the exposed bedrock which is available on the site. The sensor enclosures are clustered and separated from each other by some 7 m. The instrument cluster is at a distance of 25 m from the Service Building which houses the electrical service panels and the electronic consoles for the instrumentation. The Absolute Building is at a distance of 27 m and on the side of the Service Building opposite to the sensor array. The new Observatory became operational towards the end of June, 1989.

    A digital recording magnetometer, AMOS MK I, was installed in July, 1974. However, there were a number of problems with the digital equipment and reliable digital data did not become available until October, 1974. The aging AMOS Mk I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III towards the end of March, 1982. In turn the AMOS Mk III was replaced by the INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS in mid-June, 1991.
    was viewed: 568 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Wingst Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:14
    Wingst has been in operation since 1938. It is the successor station to Wilhelmshaven (WLH) Observatory, which was in operation from 1874 to 1911 and during the Second International Polar Year from 1931 to 1932. WLH was located 70 km SW to Wingst (36.48 deg, 8.15 deg E).
    was viewed: 498 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Vassouras Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:12
    The first Brazilian magnetic observatory was installed in Rio de Janeiro in the last decade of the XIX century, but its irregular operation was not continued after 3 years due to artificial disturbances caused by bad local conditions. The
    Vassouras magnetic observatory was commissioned in the city of Vassouras, 120 km away from Rio de Janeiro, in 1915.
    was viewed: 586 time(s); is stored in: 1 basket(s); 0 replies

    Victoria Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:11
    The Victoria Geomagnetic Observatory was established in 1957 on the grounds of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory ( now the National Research Council of Canada) on Little Saanich Mountain about 16 km north of Victoria, British Columbia. The Observatory is pleasantly situated, some 197 m above mean sea level, in a wooded area about 120 m northeast of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory office building. The site was chosen in 1956 for convenience to observatory facilities and power, while maintaining adequate separation from buildings and pipelines.

    The area is one of acid intrusive rocks of Mesozoic age. A survey was made in 1956, using a 7.5 m grid separation of stations, to determine the vertical magnetic field intensity gradients. This revealed an average station difference, independent of sign, of 25 nT +/- 20 nT standard deviation in any one difference. No large anomalies exceeding 25 nT were found within 30 m of the building site and the distribution of small anomalies was apparently random. Beyond this distance to the southeast a decrease of 50 nT was noted. The building site was therefore chosen for its fllatness and convenience as the ground falls rather steeply on east part of the site.

    Originally the magnetic equipment occupied an insulated aluminium prefabricated 4.5 m x 6.5 m building, erected in 1956 with its long axis oriented in magnetic north-south. A permanent variometer building was completed in September, 1959, located about 30 m to the east of the original temporary building; it is an insulated 5.5 m x 5.5 m cement block structure containing two 2.5 m x 4.5 m rooms and a 1 m x 5.5 m light trap entrance. The floor is a single concrete slab resting on bedrock, providing flexibility in location of instruments as well as an effective heat-sink. The control equipment for the electronic magnetometer, as well as other auxiliary variometer equipment (chronometer, power supplies, etc.) remain in the original temporary prefabricated building, with control cables linking the two buildings. The auxiliary equipment for the photographic recorders as well as that for the AMOS Mk I was moved from the prefabricated building to the office building in June, 1976.

    A permanent building for the absolute instruments was completed in September 1961, located about 30 m north of the variometer and control buildings. A three-component Ruska magnetograph was installed in September 1969. Prior to this date a portable Askania-Werke earth magnetic variograph had been the primary photographic recorder. The Ruska magnetograph ceased operation and was removed from the Observatory in April, 1985. In addition, the GSI precise magnetometer made by Sokkisha (Japan) was replaced by a D measuring fluxgate theodolite (of Earth Physics Branch design) as the primary instrument for the absolute determination of Declination and Inclination .

    Digital recordings were begun in June, 1971 with the installation of the Earth Physics Branch's AMOS Mk I. The AMOS Mk I became the primary recorder for Victoria Observatory in June, 1976. The AMOS Mk I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III in April, 1985. In turn, the AMOS Mk III was itself replaced by the CANMOS in March, 1992. The CANMOS is the present primary instrumentation at Victoria Geomagnetic Observatory.
    was viewed: 492 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Valentia Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:09
    Magnetic records for Valentia Observatory extend back to 1888. The Observatory is located at the southwestern extreme of the island of Ireland, on the Iveragh peninsula, approximately 1 km southwest of the town of Cahirsiveen.

    Variometer records began on 1st January 1954, when a set of La Cour H, D, Z variometers, together with a La Cour normal (15mm/hr) recorder first became operational at Valentia. These units served as the Observatory primary system until they were replaced by a digital magnetometer on 1st January 1989 after which they were used as a back-up system until 30th September 1993. In December 1955 a second set of La Cour H, D, Z variometers with a La Cour (180mm/hr) was installed and recorded continuously from 1st January 1956 until it was discontinued in May 1991.

    On 1st January 1989 an EDA FM105B tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer was introduced as the primary observatory variometer. From 1st Oct 1993 a second EDA FM105B tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer went into operation as a back-up system. Both instruments have a nominal output of 10 mV/nT and a dynamic range of +/- 1000 nT, and have been used at the Observatory until present. The variometer hut and recording system are described in [1].

    On 1st May 2004 the observatory variometer house (VH1) was removed form the operational program in advance of its refurbishment in 2005. This process started on 4th Feb 2004 when the primary EDA FM105B tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (FG1), datalogger and heating control systems were moved to an alternative variometer house (VH2) located on the observatory grounds. The secondary EDA FM105B tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (FG2) remained in VH1 and was used as the main operational unit from 4th Feb 2004 until 1st May 2004. On 1st May 2004 FG1 returned to the role of main operational variometer. FG2 remained operating in VH1 for comparison until refurbishment started in 2005.

    FG1 remained in VH2 for the whole of 2005 and was used as the main operational variometer throughout this period.

    Senior meteorological officers on a roster basis make baseline observations once a week. Adopted baselines are determined once a month.
    was viewed: 2242 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Uppsala Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:08
    Contact Institute
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    Tucson Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:07
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Tucson Magnetic Observatory in Arizona. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 805 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Tsumeb Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:06
    Contact Institute
    was viewed: 498 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Trelew Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:05
    Contact Institute
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    Tihany Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:04
    1955: Opening of the Geophysical Observatory at Tihany
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    Qaanaaq Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:02
    A magnetic observatory was established at Thule (76 29'N, 290 56.5'E) in January 1947 by the Danish Metorological Institute (DMI). In August 1952 however, the magnetic recordings had to be discontinued due to artificial disturbances from the nearby air base. During 1955 the observatory was re-established at the new Thule village, Qaanaaq (77 28.2'N and 290 46.4'E) and the geomagnetic observations were resumed in September 1955.

    The absolute pillar has been replaced two times. The present pillar (#3), which was taken into use ultimo November 1987, is magnetically clean, as it is made from a PVC sewage tube filled with concrete made of white cement and quartz sand. When the absolute measurements were resumed on pillar #2 and #3 respectively, no jumps were introduced in the observed values.

    Absolute measurements of H and D were performed by means of Quartz Horisontal Magnetometers (QHM) until April 1988, when they were replaced by a DI-fluxgate magnetometerfor absolute measurement of the angles D and I.

    A description of the observatory and its location is given in the yearbooks for 1955-56 and 1985-90.
    was viewed: 480 time(s); is stored in: 1 basket(s); 0 replies

    Toloyucan Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:01
    Contact Institute
    was viewed: 423 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Antananarivo Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:54:00
    The Antananarivo magnetic observatory (IAGA code TAN) was opened in 1889. The observatory is located on the Ambohidempona hill, near the town of Antananarivo. In 1983 the magnetic observatory of Antananarivo was significantly upgraded with the installation of a VFO31 variometer and a portable Declinometer-Inclinometer theodolite (EOST D-I Flux). Digital one-minute-data have been continuously recorded since 1992. An equipment for the INTERMAGNET program was added in December 1993. It includes a data collection plateform (DCP) for transmission via METEOSAT satellite to European Gin's.
    was viewed: 1104 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Tamanrasset Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:59
    The Magnetic Observatory of Tamanrasset was opened in 1930 and the first series of observations were published in 1932.

    In the frame of the deployment of its worldwide network "Observatoire magnetique planetaire", the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) along with the Centre de Recherche en Astronomie, Astrophysique et Geophysique (CRAAG) decided in 1992 to upgrade the Tamanrasset magnetic observatory in order to join INTERMAGNET network. A new data logger, a scalar and vector magnetometers were installed. In November 2004, the vector magnetometer was replaced by an
    homocentric IPGP VM391. In August 2005, the magnetometers and data logger were struck down by short circuit. The absolute pillar has remained unchanged since the 1930s.

    TAM observatory is run by engineers and technicians of the C.R.A.A.G. One-minute values are processed by IPGP.

    FAILURES:
    On the 15th of August, the magnetometers and the data logger were struck down by short circuit. The magnetic observatory restarted in December 2005.
    was viewed: 468 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Surlari Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:57
    Continuous observations began at Surlari Observatory in 1943. Absolute measurements were done three times per week. The observations were performed by Aurelia G¬tej under the supervision of Andrei Soare, Director of the Observatory.
    was viewed: 489 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    St. John's Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:56
    The St. John's Geomagnetic Observatory began operation on 1 August, 1968. A location in southeastern Newfoundland was chosen to reduce one of the largest gaps in the geographical distribution of magnetic observatories in North America. In addition to contributing data for studies of worldwide geomagnetic variations and secular change, the St. John's Observatory provides control for the marine and airborne geomagnetic surveys conducted over the broad continental shelf east of Canada.

    The initial St. John's Observatory occupied a site 3 km northeast of the centre of the city, in the White Hills area, and was approximately 1.5 km from the sea. The area is magnetically flat and the total intensity varied by less than 15 nT within the initial site. A preliminary survey of geomagnetic time variations throughout Newfoundland revealed no gross electromagnetic induction anomalies in the St. John's region but some coastal induction effect must be expected and has in fact been found.

    1968 Observatory:
    There were two non-magnetic buildings 100 m apart. The site was enclosed by an aluminum fence, segmented to avoid the disruption of the natural earth currents.

    One building was used both for the variometers and for absolute observations. It was 13 m long and 6.5 m wide, with the long axis magnetic north-south (1968), and was supported by concrete resting on the bedrock. It was of wooden construction, well insulated and covered with enamelled aluminum siding. Two reinforced and insulated concrete slabs, isolated from the walls of the building and from each other, provided support for the absolute instrument piers and the fluxgate magnetometer sensor, and for the photographic variometer tables respectively. Two insulated light-tight rooms enclosed the photographic instruments.

    The second building, about 8 m square, was of similar non- magnetic construction. It included an office, darkroom and laboratory in which the magnetic field was sufficiently undisturbed to have permitted the operation of many types of magnetometers.

    The buildings were connected by underground ducts carrying electrical power, signal and communication cables.

    The initial recording instrumentation consisted of a set of standard run RUSKA photographic variometers, a portable ASKANIA photographic variometer and a three component fluxgate magnetometer registering on an analogue paper chart recorder. St. John's was the first Canadian observatory to have a production run AMOS Mk I installed. Routine operation of the AMOS Mk I began in December, 1969

    1975 Observatory:
    Following a decision of the Department of the Environment to construct a new office and laboratory complex, the New foundland Environment Institute, on Crown Land previously reserved for the Observatory, an agreement was reached whereby DOE would relocate the recording building 100 to 125 m to the northeast. This would ensure that the recordings of the magnetic variations would not be subject to interference from traffic on the access road leading to the new Institute. A total force survey in August, 1974 revealed no significant field gradients or anomalies within the proposed observatory site. Tenders for a new magnetic observatory building were called in April, 1975. The new building, having the same specifications as the 1968 13 m by 6.5 m building, was completed in December, 1975.

    The aging AMOS Mk I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III in mid- March, 1981.

    1990 Observatory:
    Official notification by Public Works Canada (Atlantic Region) to the Earth Physics Branch indicated that the St. John's Observatory site was under considerable pressure for it to be developed for other Federal Government departments. As a result of discussions with Public Works during the summer of 1985, preliminary plans were formulated in order to move St. John's Observatory elsewhere in Newfoundland. A number of prospective sites were examined in the following 3 years but were found to be unsuitable for various reasons. In early 1988 the decision was made to move the Observatory an additional 500+ m back towards the northeast into the undeveloped White Hills Crown Land reserve. Site preparation and building construction were completed by the summer of 1989.

    The Observatory presently consists of a scattering of sensor huts and instrument buildings, all separated from each other by at least 30 m. Two 3 m by 5 m buildings of non-magnetic construction house the electronics racks and the absolute observation pier respectively. Five other prefabricated shelters house the various sensors and also serve as additional storage.

    Contrary to the usual detrimental effect of new construction on the local avifauna, a biological impact analysis by LeDrew Environmental Management Lt. showed a probable enhanced environment for the migratory snowy owls. Snowy owls nest in the White Hills area from fall to spring. Although the decrease in surface vegetation is probably appreciated by the snowy owls, it is most likely not looked upon with such enthusiasm by the local mice and shrew population. The third St. John's Observatory was placed in service in January, 1990 with the installation of the Geological Survey of Canada's prototype CANMOS. A fully INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS was installed in March, 1991.
    was viewed: 477 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    San Pablo - Toledo Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:55
    At Toledo (TOL) in 1934 was established an observatory magnetic. The first annual mean values was in 1947. In 1982 a new observatory placed in San Pablo de Los Montes (SPT), about 50 Km SW the old observatory.
    was viewed: 515 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Sodankyla Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:54
    Contact institute
    was viewed: 470 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    San Juan Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:52
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the San Juan Magnetic Observatory in Puerto Rico. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 484 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Sitka Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:51
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Sitka Magnetic Observatory in Alaska. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 507 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    San Fernando Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:50
    The Royal Observatory (ROA) started its first absolute observation series in 1879 but a continuous time recording would not begin until 1891. From then onward an almost continuous recording of the magnetic components was developped. At late seventies the railway electrifying motivated a very important interference that obliged to move to another site in 1978 (SFS second phase); this new site was located 10 km far away, northeastwardly, from the observatory.

    During the nineties the magnetic station kept recording by the use of an Overhauser proton magnetometer and a Bobrov variometer station. Railway interferences still kept (in this second site) over a 5 nT/rms (magnetic noise). In order to fulfill a higher level on precision, SFS moved in 2004 to a new site located about 60 km NE from its first emplacement.
    was viewed: 444 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Phu Thuy Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:48
    Phu Thuy magnetic observatory, located 20 km to Hanoi, was established in 1967 and magnetic variations were recorded on photographic paper by a Bobrov variograph. The absolute pillar has never been changed.

    In the frame of the deployment of its worldwide network Observatoire Magnetique Planetaire (OMP), the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) along with the Hanoi Institute of Geophysics (HIG) decided to upgrade the PHU magnetic observatory in order to join INTERMAGNET. In 1994 new equipment was installed in Phu Thuy matching the INTERMAGNET specifications. In February 1999 a new data logger was installed and the scalar and the vector magnetometers were moved. On August 2001 IPGP upgraded the PHU equipment. End of may 2003, the observatory was striked down by lightning. Mid-June 2005, the observatory was striken down by lightning. The magnetic monitoring was set in again mid-august 2005.
    was viewed: 431 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Resolute Bay Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:47
    The Resolute Bay Geomagnetic Observatory was established in Resolute on Cornwallis Island, North West Territories in 1948. However, photographic variometers capable of recording the changes in the geomagnetic field in three components were not placed in operation until November, 1953.

    Digital recordings of the geomagnetic field were begun in July, 1973 with the installation of the Earth Physics Branch's AMOS Mk I. The aging AMOS MK I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III in December, 1980. In turn, the AMOS Mk III was replaced by the INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS in mid-January, 1992.
    was viewed: 451 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Qsaybeh Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:46
    Magnetic measurements and recordings in Lebanon started in the early years of the 20th century at the Ksara Observatory, a private institution, which ended all activities in 1975. Ksara data were published in the yearbooks of the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris. In close partnership with the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, the QSB observatory was inaugurated on April 17, 2000 and was accepted in August 2001 as an IMO.

    QSB observatory is run by the staff of the National Center for Geophysical Research. One-minute values are processed by IPGP.
    was viewed: 395 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Port Stanely Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:45
    Contact Institute
    was viewed: 433 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    PamataiI Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:44
    Continuous observations began at Pamatai in 1969 under the responsability of ORSTOM. Since 1996, the observatory is IPGP property. It is operated in collaboration with the Laboratoire de Geophysique (LDG) of the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). The PPT observatory was moved by some hundreds of meters and a new equipment was installed during the year 1995. The observatory reference was modified (jump on 1996.0). In march 2002, the reference pillar changed a second time (jump on 2002.0), and new equipments were installed farther from local disturbances. Azimuth marks were measured by topographers (TopoPacifique) and JC RUEGG (IPGP) (july-december 2004). In december 2002, water leaks of the absolute pavilion roof damaged the absolute pillar. Absolute measurements restarted on may 2003. From July to september 2003, the stealing of the DI-Flux stopped the absolute measurements. In november 2004, the vector magnetometer was replaced with an homocentric IPGP VM391.
    was viewed: 463 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Phu Thuy Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:42
    Phu Thuy magnetic observatory, located 20 km to Hanoi, was established in 1967 and magnetic variations were recorded on photographic paper by a Bobrov variograph. The absolute pillar has never been changed.

    In the frame of the deployment of its worldwide network Observatoire Magnetique Planetaire (OMP), the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) along with the Hanoi Institute of Geophysics (HIG) decided to upgrade the PHU magnetic observatory in order to join INTERMAGNET. In 1994 new equipment was installed in Phu Thuy matching the INTERMAGNET specifications. In February 1999 a new data logger was installed and the scalar and the vector magnetometers were moved. On August 2001 IPGP upgraded the PHU equipment. End of may 2003, the observatory was striked down by lightning. Mid-June 2005, the observatory was striken down by lightning. The magnetic monitoring was set in again mid-august 2005.
    was viewed: 416 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Poste-de-la-Baleine Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:41
    The Dominion Observatory of the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys (now part of the Natural Resources Canada) established the Great Whale River Geomagnetic Observatory (IAGA alphabetic code: GWC) in January, 1965 at what was then Great Whale River, Quebec. (Great Whale River became known as Poste-de-la-Baleine and is now officially designated as Kuujjuaraapik/Whapmagoostui). The Observatory was designed to assist in conjugate point studies: its location was geomagnetically conjugate to the Observatory at Byrd in Antarctica. (Byrd, operated by the United States of America, was closed October, 1971.) The instrumentation installed in Great Whale River was similar to that installed in Byrd and included both standard and rapid-run RUSKA photographic variometers. The photographic rapid-run variometer, recording at a chart speed of 240 mm/hr, operated for the period 1 January, 1965 to 24 August, 1972. Digital recordings of the geomagnetic field were begun in October, 1972 with the installation of the Earth Physics Branch's AMOS Mk I. The aging Amos Mk I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III in mid-June, 1982. In turn, the AMOS Mk III was replaced by the INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS towards the end of July, 1991.

    The village of Poste-de-la-Baleine is located on a broad sandy spit at the mouth of the Grande Riviere de la Baleine on the east shore of the Hudson Bay. The area consists of Archaean granites largely overlain with a thick layer of sand. The sand was tested for magnetic properties and found to contain significant quantities of magnetite.

    A suitable site for the first Observatory was selected in July, 1964. The site was a rock ridge 25 m above sea level about 2 km north of the airport's east-west runway. Two buildings were erected in September 1964. Both buildings were of wooden construction, non-magnetic throughout, with concrete slab floors poured on bedrock. The local sand was not used because of its magnetic properties. The absolute building was 6 m by 4.5 m; the variometer building was 6 m by 6 m. The variometer building was divided into two light-tight recording rooms: one for the standard photographic variometer and the other for the rapid-run photographic variometer.

    The Observatory was supplied with electrical power by a buried cable which originated in the village. As the sand shifted over the years, the cable became exposed and became damaged a number of times. The exposed cable also became a hazard to traffic on a frequently used nearby trail. After an analysis of the costs involved, it was found to be cheaper to move the Observatory closer to the village. As a result, Great Whale River Observatory (GWC) was closed on 31 July, 1984 and the new Poste-de-la-Baleine Observatory (PBQ) was opened on 9 September, 1984. PBQ is approximately 2 km to the southeast of GWC.

    The present Observatory is situated approximately 100 m east of the Centre Etudes Nordiques and consists of two 2.5 m by 2.5 m buildings which serve as the instrument and absolute buildings respectively. The sensors are housed in individual enclosures which are at sufficient distances from each other and the buildings so as not to experience any magnetic interference.
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    Port-aux-Francais Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:38
    The first magnetic observatory operated in the Kerguelen Islands was established on the site of Observatory Bay (49.420 S - 69.889 E) by the German Expedition " D.S.P ". K.Luyken was the observer and made regular absolute observations during years 1902-1903.

    In 1957, during the International Geophysical Year (IGY),the Kerguelen observatory (IAGA code KGL) was opened near the Port-aux-Francais base. This base is located on the shallow plain of the Courbet Peninsula, eastward of Kerguelen Island. The magnetic observatory was setup on the western side of a small valley, 300 meters away from the laboratory quarters of the main base. This observatory comprised two huts. One of these huts housed the " La Cour " magnetograph, and the other one the absolute pier (49.352 S - 70.215 E). Magnetic observation routine involved continuous recording of the magnetic field variations (H, D, Z), based on the " La Cour " magnetograph and absolute measurements performed with a Chasselon theodolite (D), a Cambridge inclinometer (I), a B.M.Z. and a Q.H.M.

    From the beginning, large magnetic anomalies were detected around absolute and variometer shelters, being caused by the basaltic flows which outcrops near the coast line and everywhere around Port-aux-Francais. Thus, it was impossible to avoid this perturbation. The observatory was operated in these conditions until 1966. In 1967, two photoelectric feedback field magnetometers (H and D components) and an optical pumping magnetometer (Ceasium vapor supplied by Varian) were set up in a new thermostated shelter. A digital " punched tape " recorder was used to sample the H,D and F elements at 1-minute intervals. This system was operating until 1971 and absolute measurements were still made by means of traditional instruments (Chasselon theodolite, Q.H.M., B.M.Z., completed by an ELSEC proton precession magnetometer. In 1972, a VFO31 triaxial fluxgate variometer was installed at KGL observatory. A low-power device for digital recording on magnetic tape was used (1973-1987). Since 1980 an EOST D-I fluxgate has replaced the traditional absolute instruments. A proton magnetometer was used for the measurements of total field F. " La Cour " magnetograph was definitively removed in 1981, after more than twenty years of continuous working. In 1988 a new absolute hut was established for logistic reasons approximatively 3 km east of former KGL observatory site. The variometer shelter moved there as well. The new observatory was named Port-aux-Francais (IAGA code PAF) and references were modified. In 1988 a new digital data logger was developed on a PC basis.
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    Ottawa Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:37
    Ottawa Geomagnetic Observatory was established in 1968 as part of a new complex of magnetic laboratories of the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources ( now Natural Resources Canada). The site is located immediately east of the city of Ottawa. The new observatory became fully operational on 1 July, 1968 and is the replacement for Agincourt observatory which had to be closed in March 1969 owing to industrial development and highway construction in the vicinity of the site. Agincourt Observatory had been in continuous operation since 1898 and was itself a replacement for the Toronto Observatory. The Toronto Observatory had been established in late 1839 but was closed following the electrification of the Toronto tramway system.

    The Ottawa Observatory is located on the east-west ridge of land known as Dolman Ridge. The ridge is bounded on the north by the swamps and marshes of Mer Bleue and on the south by the Borthwick Creek swampland. Dolman Ridge is a feature of the Recent geological period and was at one time an island in the Champlain Sea.

    Construction of the magnetic laboratory complex was started in 1965 and was finished in 1968. In addition to the Ottawa Geomagnetic Observatory the complex includes the instrument development laboratories of the Geomagnetic, Seismic and Continental Geoscience programs of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The Ottawa Observatory consists of a variometer building, an air-conditioned electronics control building and two absolute buildings. The variometer and electronics buildings are 6 m by 6 m. The absolute buildings are 12 m by 5 m with marble instrument piers. All the buildings are of concrete block and wood construction. Sand, gravel and other materials used in the construction of the buildings were carefully tested to be non-magnetic. Buried power lines and signal cables in two carefully separated conduits connect all buildings in the complex with the main office/laboratory building.
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    Novosibirsk Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:35
    The Novosibirsk Joint magnetic-ionospheric station "Klyuchi" (Geophysical observatory "Klyuchi") was established in 1962 under the decision of Presidium of Academy of Science of USSR. The first part of Station was completed near settlement Klyuchi at distance about 10 km from Novosibirsk Scientific Center (Akademgorodok) in 1964.

    Three pavilions for magnetic observations were build at distance about 400 m from main building in which the workshop, the photoroom, processing rooms, rooms for staff and the digital ionosonde "Parus" are located. Near this building the rhomb antenna of the ionosonde is stand. The brick variation and technical huts are similar with size about 6x6 m, the wooden absolute hut have size about 3x3 m.

    The old magnetic variometers are three sets of Bobrov's quartz variometers with photorecording system (the primary set of four variometers - D, H, Z, T is used till now). Regular magnetic measurements were started in 1967. Absolute observations were performed using various devices: (1) the standard quartz declinometers and QM-magnetometers until 2001, (2) the proton magnetometer AKM with our sensor, (3) DI-fluxgate with non-magnetic theodolite Theo 020B (since 1991) and 3T2KP (since 2001 as regular device) and our fluxgate sensors, (4) Overhauser magnetometer POS-1 (since 2003). The magnetic monitoring using the devices noted above was performed in according to IAGA Standards. The hourly mean data were send to WDC by Geomagnetism every year.

    The triaxial fluxgate magnetometer LEMI-008 (Lviv Centre of Institute of Space Research) was obtained by Observatory "Klyuchi" in May 2003 under CRENEGON Project (INTAS). Magnetometer is oriented in XYZ-system and is placed in variation hut on free (West) pillar inside thermostatic module together Bobrov's variometers. The variometer hut was built from silicate bricks with the thickness of the wall about 0.5 m. Thermostatic section contained the pillars and sensors was isolated by wooden partition. Thermostatic regulator keep the stability of the temperature of inside module up to 1C during all year.

    The total field difference between main pillar for absolute DI-observations and pillar for continuous recording of F by scalar magnetometer POS-1 is 7.43 nT. Thus, the resulted F-values in binary files are F(recorded)+7.43.
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    Nurmijarvi Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:34
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    Niemegk Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:32
    1832-1871 magnetic observations at the Berlin astronomical observatory by Alexander von Humboldt 1890-1928 Potsdam Magnetic Observatory (Max Eschenhagen, Adolf Schmidt) 1907-1932 Seddin Magnetic Observatory 23 July 1930: Opening of the Geomagnetic Adolf Schmidt Observatory Niemegk
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    Newport Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:31
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Newport Magnetic Observatory in Washington. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
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    Nagycenk Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:30
    The Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory was established in 1957 by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Continuous magnetic observations began in 1961. The original La-Cour magnetometers are partly still in operation.

    Since 1st January 1992, the magnetic measurements have been based on the ARGOS system (which has been designed and installed by the British Geological Survey, Geomagnetism Group). The system incorporates a triaxial fluxgate magnetometer and a DIDD proton magnetometer for quasi-absolute measurement. Fluxgate variometer measures the X, Y, Z components, and the data are converted to H, D, Z.
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    Narsarsuaq Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:28
    A magnetic observatory was established at Narsarsuaq (61￸09.6'N and 314￸33.5'E) during 1967 by the Danish Metorological Institute (DMI) as a successor for the temporary IGY/IQSY-observatory at Julianehaab, 70 km SW of Narsarsuaq.

    The original absolute pillar was replaced medio 1988 by a magnetically clean one made from a PVC sewage tube filled with concrete made of white cement and quartz sand. The preferred height of the pillar is 120 cm, but due to lack of moulding material, the height became only 116 cm. To obtain the preferred height, the theodolite was therefore placed on the base of an old La Cour Z-variometer, which was standing on top of the pillar. This arrangement was used until August 1993, when an extra top of 5 cm nonmagnetic concrete was added to the pillar. Absolute measurements of H and D were performed by means of Quartz Horisontal Magnetometers (QHM) till primo December 1988, when they were replaced by a DI-fluxgate magnetometer for absolute measurement of the angles D and I.

    A description of the observatory and its location is given in the observatoty yearbooks for 1968-70, 1980-82 and for 1985-90.
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    Memambetsu Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:27
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    Meanook Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:26
    Meanook Geomagnetic Observatory was established in July, 1916. The site is 136 km north of the city of Edmonton, Alberta and 18 km south of the town of Athabasca.

    The Observatory is located on the top of the plain to the west of Tawatinaw valley. The site is underlain by Upper Cretaceous sedimentary deposits to a depth of 2 km. The nearest railway passes through the bottom of the valley about 5 km southeast of the Observatory.

    A recording basement to house Kew-type variometers was added to the original building in 1927. The absolute building and the heating system were renovated in 1940. In 1941 an annex to the basement recording room was constructed to house the two sets of LaCour variometers which had been located in a temporary hut since the International Polar Year (1932-1933). In 1951 the absolute instruments and LaCour variometers were transferred to a new magnetic observatory building. In 1955 an additional 215 hectares of land adjacent to the Observatory were purchased. Ground electrodes were established 1.6 km apart in north-south and east-west directions for the study of telluric currents.

    Meanook Observatory was considerably expanded for the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958). In addition to the standard magnetic observatory, an auroral all-sky camera, an auroral intensity recorder, a patrol spectrograph a vertical incidence sounder, a fixed ionosphere backscatter sounder, a riometer and a telluric recorder were also in operation at the station. During the second International Polar Year the station consisted of only two buildings on a one hectare site; in 1957 the station possessed 15 buildings on a protected area of 219 hectares. Land and buildings no longer required for Earth Physics Branch (now part of the Geological Survey of Canada) programs were transferred to the Department of Public Works on 1 July, 1976. The 1951 magnetic observatory building and the old absolute building which still housed the optical variograph (RUSKA) were retained for the operation of the Meanook Geomagnetic Observatory. The old absolute building was demolished in 1988. The remaining building
    is centred in a 213 m by 213 m area reserved exclusively for the use of the Geomagnetic Program. The excess land is now in use, by the Meanook Biological Research Station, University of Alberta.

    Only declination was recorded from 1916 to August 1927, at which time horizontal force and declination differential photographic recorders of the Kew-type were installed. A vertical force magnetometer was installed in September, 1931. Standard and low sensitivity LaCour recorders replaced the Kew variometers in 1933. RUSKA variometers were installed in May, 1961 in the basement of the old absolute building. The RUSKA variometers were adopted as the standard recorders on 1 October, 1963. The production of optically recorded magnetograms was discontinued on 31 July, 1979.

    Digital recordings of the geomagnetic field were begun in November, 1970 with the installation of the Earth Physics Branch's AMOS Mk I. The AMOS Mk I became the primary recorder for Meanook Observatory on 1 January, 1976. The aging AMOS Mk I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III in late November, 1980. In turn, the AMOS Mk III was replaced by the INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS in mid-June, 1991.
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    Macquarie Island Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:25
    A magnetic station was first established at Caroline Cove at the southern end of Macquarie Island in December 1911 by Eric Webb. Another magnetic station, refered to as station A was established, also in 1911, on the Macquarie Island isthmus which is at the northern end of the island. Station A was re-occupied in 1930 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Expedition (BANZARE) and again in 1948 by the first Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition (ANARE). The Macquarie Island magnetic observatory was built at the ANARE station on the isthmus and magnetic recording has been continuous since 1952. The observatory was upgraded to produce digital data in October 1984. Data recording was upgraded to one second sampling rates in 1993. The Macquarie Island Observatory was accepted as an Intermagnet Magnetic Observatory in March 2002. A suspended three axis fluxgate magnetic variometer was installed in August 2004. A GEM GSM90 proton magnetometer was installed in May 2005. The system was upgraded to provided real-time data in June 2005.
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    Mbour Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:24
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    Mawson Station Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:22
    The magnetic observatory is part of Mawson scientific research station, built on the edge of Horseshoe Harbour, MacRobertson Land, in Antarctica. It is built on bare charnockite basement rock: there is no ice or soil cover.

    The magnetic observatory buildings, comprising the ABSOLUTE HOUSE and the VARIOMETER HOUSE, are situated at the south-east extremity of the station, at East Bay. They are in a magnetic quiet zone.

    In 1955 the Mawson observatory commenced recording magnetic variations with a three-component analogue magnetograph. The observatory has continuously recorded the geomagnetic field (and seismic activity) at Mawson since that time. In December 1985 the magnetic observatory was converted to digital recording. It is operated by Geoscience Australia as part of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE).
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    Manhay Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:21
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    Lanzhou Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:20
    The magnetic observatory of Lanzhou (LZH) was opened in 1958. LZH is under the management of the State Seismological Bureau (SSB). The observations were published by the Institute of Geophysics (China Seismological Bureau). In the frame of the deployment of its worldwide network Observatoire Magnetique Planetaire"(OMP), the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) along with the China Seismological Bureau (Lanzhou Institute of Seismology, LIS-CSB) decided to upgrade the LZH magnetic observatory in order to join INTERMAGNET. In April 2001 a new equipment was installed in Lanzhou matching the INTERMAGNET specifications. In Mars 2004 the vector magnetometer was replaced with an IPGP VM391.
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    Lviv Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:18
    Magnetic observatory at settlement Ivano-Frankovo (Janow) near Lviv was founded at 1932 by professor Bronislaw Arctowski
    from University Jana Kazimira at Lviv. Observatory began regular activity in 1952. From 1952 recording of magnetic field variations had been made in classical manner on photopaper by means of quartz Bobrov's variometers. From 2002 the digital recording with Polish manetometers PSM has been carriet out.
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    Learmonth Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:17
    The Learmonth Solar Observatory was established in 1977. In 1981 a request was received from the Ionospheric Prediction Service for assistance in monitoring variation in a single component of the magnetic field at the Solar Observatory. It was agreed that a full magnetic observatory should be established at the solar observatory. A Proton precession magnetometer was run at the site from October 1983 until the geomagnetic observatory was installed in November 1986.

    A three component EDA FM105B fluxgate magnetometer was initially installed at the observatory with an Elsec model 595 proton precession magnetometer. Magnetic variations were recorded on a chart recorder and minute averages were digitized and recorded on cassette using an EDAS-2 A/D data logger. The EDA fluxgate was installed in the HDZ orientation, which at Learmonth is within a degree of the XYZ orientation. At some stage the original Elsec 595 PPM was replaced with a Elsec 820 PPM. EDAS-2 cassette based data recording became unreliable and was replaced on 06:13UT 09 December 1992 (day 344) when a IBM compatible PC was introduced to log the data. Data logging has been performed by computer since that time. The EDAS-2 A/D data logger continued its function as an A/D converter for serial digital data input to the PC system until February 1999.

    The electronics consoles and data logger/Computer were installed in the Solar Observatory Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN) building. The fluxgate sensor was housed in a concrete vault, 800mm deep with 600mm sides which are partially buried. The vault was located approximetely 36 metres to the east of the RSTN building. The PPM sensor was initially mounted on a wooden pole about 10m from the fluxgate vault. In September 1995 a second underground vault was constructed to house the PPM sensor and the existing Elsec 820 PPM was replaced with a Geometrics G856 PPM. The EDA fluxgate was replaced with a Narod three axis ringcore fluxgate on 12 February 1999. The Narod instrument produced digital data so the EDAS-2 A/D converter was no longer needed. One channel of the Narod fluxgate developed a fault on 01 February 2000 and the whole instrument was replaced on 14 August 2001 with a Bartington MAG03MSL70 fluxgate and PAR24B 24 bit A/D converter. The Bartington variometer proved to be unstable and was replaced with a suspended DMI FGE three axis fluxgate variometer and ADAM 4017 A/D converter on 12 December 2001, Also at this time a third underground vault was constructed 3 metres from the fluxgate vault to house the DMI fluxgate variometer electronics.
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    Lerwick Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:15
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    Kourou Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:14
    The Kourou magnetic Observatory is installed on the European Space Center in French Guyana and is operated with the cooperation of the Guyana Space Center (CSG) staff. Continuous observations began in 1995. The equipment of Kourou magnetic observatory has been up-dated in may 2000.
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    Kakioka Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:13
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    Kakadu Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:12
    The Kakadu Magnetic Observatory is a part of the Kakadu Geophysical Observatory, located at the South Alligator Ranger Station of the Australian Nature Conservation Agency, Kakadu National Park, which is 210km east of Darwin and 40km west of Jabiru, on the Arnhem Highway in the Northern Territory. The observatory is situated on unconsolidated ferruginous and clayey sand. The Geophysical Observatory also houses a seismological observatory and a gravity station. Continuous magnetic recording
    began there in March 1995.
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    Kakioka Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:10
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    Irkutsk Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:09
    A magnetic observatory was established at Irkutsk in 1886 by the Department of National Education. Because of the increasing level of artificial noise it was moved in 1914 to Zuy, 30 km northwest of Irkutsk. Until 1960, the magnetic observatory was part of the magneto-ionospheric complex station. At present the observatory is governed by the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (formerly
    Siberian Institute of the Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave propagation) of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences. Electrification of the railway in 1958 caused the observatory to be moved to Patrony village, 20 km southeast of Irkutsk. It has an area of 2.6 hectares on the bank of the Angara river. There are main building and special pavilions for absolute and variation measurements at the observatory. Communication with the Institute is through telephone channel.
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    Iqaluit Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:07
    Consideration was given to building a magnetic observatory in Iqaluit in the middle of 1988. However, it was not until August, 1990 that discussions were held with officials from Arctic College, Nunatta Campus, as to establishing an observatory as a joint project. In preparation for the construction, the Municipality of Iqaluit granted in December, 1990, rights to a parcel of land to the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) for recording the variations in the geomagnetic field. Towards the end of March, 1994 a formal Memorandum of Understanding was signed by the GSC and the Arctic College towards the establishment of a magnetic observatory in Iqaluit. The Understanding committed the GSC to bear the cost of the material and the Arctic College to providing the labor for the construction.

    The site chosen for the new observatory is on the side of a hill, 1.4 km to the north from the centre of Iqaluit and 400 m to north of the Arctic College. The area has significant exposures of Archaean gneiss. Unfortunately, a preliminary Total Force survey of the site showed that F variations could be as high as 1400 nT over 30 m. This amount of magnetic relief is prevalent in Iqaluit.

    Apprentice carpenters from the Arctic College completed the construction of an Absolute Building ( 4.8 m by 2.4 m by 2.4 m), the Service Building ( 4.8 m by 3.6 m by 2.4 m) and the various sensor shelters during the summer of 1994. The two buildings and the sensor shelters are scattered over the site in the same fashion as that for other Canadian observatories such as Yellowknife. The Observatory was furnished with an NTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS in October, 1994. However, various instrumental and operational difficulties precluded the routine collection of data until January, 1995.

    During 1995 it became apparent that problems existed within the data as the difference between the calculated F from the fluxgate and the measured F from the total force magnetometer varied. This was especially noticeable during periods of magnetic disturbances. The problem persisted even though the various magnetometers were replaced during 1995. A re-examination of the earlier F survey showed that the F sensor and the 3-component fluxgate sensor were situated on either side of a substantial F anomaly. It was therefore decided to move the sensors to an area of lower magnetic relief. This was done in August, 1996 and resulted in a substantial reduction in the problem.

    CANMOS (Canadian Magnetic Observatory System) has been designed by the GSC Geomagnetism Program staff, who have developed the software to control the magnetometers and to process the basic digital data. CANMOS includes:
    - a commercial tri-axial ringcore fluxgate magnetometer, mounted on a tilt correcting suspension (of GSC design);
    - an Overhauser Proton Precession Magnetometer;
    - a bus-clock for timing control;
    - various storage media;
    - RS-232 outputs for 1 second, 5 second and 1 minute data streams.

    During 2005 the municipality established a new subdivision at the location of the original observatory site. The rights to a new parcel of land were granted and funding contributed to the relocation of the observatory. Staff from the GSC magnetically surveyed several locations and settled on a site approximately 500m up the hill from the former observatory. The geology is similar to the former site and the buildings were situated to minimize magnetic differences between the sensor enclosures.

    Unfortunately, there was no opportunity to continue the operation of the original observatory beyond the beginning of July 2005 as construction of the subdivision infrastructure had already begun.

    All instrumentation has been kept the same. GSC staff completed the construction of the new sensor enclosures in October 2005. The service building and the absolute building were transported from the previous observatory location. The new enclosures are modular sensor vaults constructed of fiberglass and cement.
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    Huancayo Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:06
    The Huancayo Geomagenetic Observatory was founded by the Carnegie Institution in 1922 and transferred to the Peruvian government in 1947. The Geophysical Institute of Huancayo was established that same year; in 1962 it was renamed the Geophysical Institute of Peru, which better reflected the scope and area of its work. The Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory is the unique in the magnetic equatorial region and rare anywhere in the world. Huancayo have the longest equatorial magnetic series in the world.
    The discovery of "surprising events", its privileged location and the high quality of the scientific information it was producing turned Huancayo into a world-renowned center of geophysics. In June, 2003 Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory is accepted as a full INTERMAGNET Observatory (IMO).
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    Hornsund Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:05
    In the summer of 1978, two pavilions of the Hornsund magnetic station, measuring and recording, were built, and since that time of tree elements of the magnetic field are recording.
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    Hurbanovo Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:03
    The Geomagnetic Observatory at Hurbanovo was founded in the year 1893. However, geomagnetic measurements in Hurbanovo (O-Gyalla, Starᅠ Dala) had begun earlier and they date back to the years 1867-1871, when measurements were made sporadically. The State Observatory in Hurbanovo was officially founded in 30th September, 1900. Now, the Hurbanovo Observatory is part of the Geophysical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciencies. It is located in South Slovakia, 100 km east from Bratislava.
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    Honolulu Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:53:00
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Honolulu Magnetic Observatory in Hawaii. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
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    Hel Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:58
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    Hermanus Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:57
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    Hartebeesthoek Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:56
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    Hartland Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:54
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    Zhaoqing Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:53
    The Geomagnetic observatory of Zhaoqing was established in November 2001 and has been operating since January 2002. It is one of the most southern geomagnetic observatories in China. Its precursor, Guangzhou Geomagnetic observatory was established in 1956, associated with the International Geophysical Year. Due to interference by subway developments of Guangzhou City, it was compelled to be moved to Zhaoqing in 2001.A new observatory was established at Zhaoqing which was located about 100 km to the west of Guangzhou city, thereby continuing further recordings at this place and the recordings at Guangzhou were then discontinued. The triaxial fluxgate variometer (type GM3, China) and DI fluxgate magnetometer were installed at the end of 2001. The three component DMI suspended fluxgate and over Hauser effect proton magnetometer (type GSM-90) were installed in 18 April 2002. The Zhaoqing observatory was accepted as an Intermagnet observatory in June 2003. Since July 2003 the data are transmitted to EDIGIN via E-mail. Henceforth, because the problem of the E-mail
    server, the data deliver is very abnormality, often having the interruption.
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    Guimar Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:52
    The old observatory magnetic was established at Santa Cruz de Tenerife (TEN) in 1957. The first annual mean values was calculated in 1961. In 1993 a new observatory was placed in Guimar (GUI), about 25 Km SW the old observatory.

    The tropical storm Delta hit Tenerife Island causing significant damage to the hightension cable system od the whole island. The G■mar municipality was seriously affected by Delta, causing the instrumentation of the Observatory to be out of operation until December 31 2005.
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    Guam Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:51
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Guam Magnetic Observatory in the Marianna Islands. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
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    Gnangara Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:49
    The first magnetic observatory to operate in Western Australia was the Watheroo Magnetic Observatory, 180 km north of the city of Perth. The observatory was established by the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism in 1919, with W.F.Wallis the inaugural observer-in-charge. Variations
    in H, D and Z were recorded at Watheroo using an Eschenhagen variometer.

    The observatory was transferred to the Australian Government on 1 January 1947 and operated by the then Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics (BMR) (renamed the Australian Geological Survey Organisation in 1992 and now, since 2001, called Geoscience Australia). In the late 1950s a decision was made to transfer the observatory from Watheroo to Gnangara, near Perth. Recordings were made at both Watheroo and Gnangara from June 1957 until the observatory at Watheroo was closed in March 1959.

    Analogue recording of H, D and Z at Gnangara continued until 3 July 1990 when digital recording commenced using a Littlemore Automatic Magnetic Observatory (AMO) that recorded 1-minute variations in the magnetic elements of D, F and I. The raw-data were recorded on magnetic tape. The AMO ceased operation on 01 May 1993 when it was damaged by lightning. The new system, that began recording in July 1993, was an EDA FM105B three-component variometer and a cycling PPM, recording 1-minute values on a personal computer. Acquisition was upgraded to record 1-second data in September 1994.
    was viewed: 561 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Godhavn Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:48
    A magnetic observatory was established at Godhavn in 1926 by the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI). But due to artificial disturbances from the surrounding settlement it was getting more and more difficult to keep the observatory measurements at the wanted standard. During 1975 the observatory was therefore moved to a new site 500 meters NNE of the old position.
    was viewed: 521 time(s); is stored in: 1 basket(s); 0 replies

    Grocka Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:47
    In 1957 continuous magnetic recordings began at Grocka Geomagnetic Observatory (GCK). Field measurements at repeat stations were made at the same time. Grocka Observatory is still the only institution of its kind in the territory of former Yugoslavia. The frequency of the repeat station measurements and the instruments used will be discussed. A new network of magnetic repeat stations was designed for the territory of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FR Yugoslavia). Between 1994 and 1998, geomagnetic surveys and first order surveys have been done at repeat stations (secular stations).
    was viewed: 506 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Fuerstenfeldbruck Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:45
    August 1, 1840, Johann von Lamont started a geomagnetic observatory at the Sternwarte in Muenchen. Registration period 1840-1927. Observatory Maisach 1927 - 1937. Observatory Fuerstenfeldbruck since 1939. Ref.: Beblo, M. (1991) 150 years Earthmagnetic Observatories Muenchen - Maisach -Fuerstenfeldbruck. MGM 5, Muenchen
    was viewed: 458 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Fresno Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:44
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Fresno Magnetic Observatory in California. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 602 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Fredericksburg Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:42
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Fredericksburg Magnetic Observatory in Virginia. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 699 time(s); is stored in: 1 basket(s); 0 replies

    Fort Churchill Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:41
    Photographic recording of the geomagnetic field variations was begun at Fort Churchill, Manitoba in 1957 by the Defence Research Northern Laboratory of the Defence Research Board, primarily to provide information for the Fort Churchill Rocket Program. In July, 1965 the operation of the Churchill Research Range, including the Geomagnetic Observatory, was taken over by the National Research Council of Canada. However, funding for the operation of the Geomagnetic Observatory was provided by the Dominion Observatory, Department of Mines and Technical Surveys (now the Geological Survey of Canada, Natural Resources Canada). Title was transferred to the department in 1972. Digital recordings of the geomagnetic field were begun with the Earth Physics Branch's AMOS Mk I in September, 1971. The aging AMOS Mk I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III late in November, 1981. In turn, the AMOS Mk III was replaced by the INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS in April, 1991.

    CANMOS (Canadian Magnetic Observatory System) has been designed by the GSC Geomagnetism Program staff, who have developed the software to control the magnetometers and to process the basic digital data. CANMOS includes:
    - a commercial tri-axial ringcore fluxgate magnetometer, mounted on a tilt correcting suspension (of GSC design);
    - an Overhauser Proton Precession Magnetometer;
    - a bus-clock for timing control;
    - various storage media;
    - RS-232 outputs for 1 second, 5 second and 1 minute data streams.
    was viewed: 505 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Eyrewell Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:40
    The Eyrewell Magnetic Observatory was established in 1978 by the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR). Its operation was taken over by the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd in 1992 when the DSIR was disestablished. From 1993, when the Institute closed its Christchurch office, the routine operation of the observatory, data processing and maintenance was carried out under contract by Geoscience, Electronics and Data Services (Geoserve). From December 2004, GNS took back responsibility for operating the observatory.
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    Eskdalemuir Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:39
    Contact institute
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    Ebre Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:37
    Ebre magnetic observatory was established at Roquetes in 1905 by the Jesuit Company. They recorded the magnetic field continuously except with the time of the civil war. Due to artificial disturbances we were forced to look for a remote place and in 2001, in collaboration with the IGN Institute, we stablished a new variometric station in Horta de Sant Joan (27 Km far from the main Observatory).
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    Dumont d'urville Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:36
    After 1950, the first magnetic measurements in the region of Terre Adelie (Antarctica) were carried out in Port Martin, a base set up by the French polar expeditions (Missions Paul Emile Victor) in January 1950. The Port Martin magnetic observatory,created by P.N. Mayaud, was operated until February 1952 when the Port Martin base was destroyed by fire. In the austral summer 1956, the permanent Dumont d'Urville base was created.
    During the IGY, the Dumont d'Urville observatory, situated on one of the coastal islands of the Pointe Geologie
    archipelago, in Terre Adelie, was the only main observatory. A temporary observation station (the Charcot station) was set up 317 km away, to the south of Dumont d'Urville on the Antarctic inlandsis.

    The magnetic observatory of Dumont d'Urville comprised three huts set up in the Petrels island, a few hundred metres away from the residential quarters of the base. One of the huts housed the La Cour magnetograph and another smaller hut housed the absolute pier. An additional hut, equipped whith heating supply and telephone, was used to store apparatus and batteries and served as a shelter for observers during violent blizzards.
    Large local magnetic anomalies were detected, on the whole Petrel Island and especially around the absolute huts. These anomalies are due to outcropping veins of magnetite in the metamorphic, 1.7 milliard year old rocks. Therefore, it was known from the very opening of this observatory in April 1957, that the mean level of the magnetic field measured in this region was not representative of the regional magnetic field. However, the variations in mean field values could be considered as being relevant indicators of secular variation Absolute measurements encountered major difficulties due to the low value of the horizontal component of the magnetic
    field and to magnetic disturbance, which is a common feature during the summer season. These difficulties were already known. P.N. Mayaud had faced them during 1951-1952 winters at Port Martin. Absolute measurements were made by mean of a Q.H.M., especially constructed for that purpose by P.A.Blum (IPGP), and by mean of a large-field B.M.Z. A La Cour magnetograph, oriented in the X-, Y- and the Z- directions
    recorded the variations of the Earth's magnetic field. The observatory worked in this configuration until 1969.
    In 1969 two photoelectric feed-back magnetometers (X and Y components) and an optical pumping magnetometer (Caesium vapor supplied by Varian) were set up in a new shelter heated at a constant temperature. A digital recording device on perforated tape was used to sample the X,Y and F elements at 1-minute intervals. This type of set-up ran until 1972 and absolute measurements continued to be made by means of traditional instruments (Polar Q.H.M., B.M.Z., completed by an ELSEC proton precession magnetometer).
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    Dourbes Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:35
    Contact institute
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    Del Rio Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:33
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Del Rio Magnetic Observatory in Texas. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 521 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Crozet Island Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:32
    The Possession island (150 km2),that belongs to the oriental part of Crozet archipelago, is a complex strato-volcano. The Alfred Faure base, eastward of the Possession Island, is situated on a plateau sloping towards the sea. This plateau is composed of a series of detrital volcanic units produced by the erosion of olivine and pyroxene bearing lava flows.

    The magnetic station of Port Alfred, opened in 1964, was first exclusively aimed at the study of earth magnetic
    pulsations and micropulsations . From 1972 onwards, the necessary equipment for a permanent magnetic observatory was gradually put in. The Port Alfred magnetic observatory (IAGA code CZT),located in the eastern part of the Possession Island was finally opened in 1974.
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    Charters Towers Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:31
    The Charters Towers magnetic Observatory is placed on Galindez island in West Antarctica Academik Vernadsky station, former Faraday station, UK). The magnetic field variations have been recorded since 1957 by La Cour magnetograph. Since 1980 Fluxgate EDA magnetometer have been used for the digital record. Now the digital recording with two LEMI 008 magnetometers by XYZ and HDZ orientation respectively is being carried out.
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    Canberra Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:29
    The first magnetic observatory to operate in Australia was the Rossbank Magnetic Observatory at Hobart. The observatory was established by the Royal Society of London in 1840 during an expedition led by Captains
    Clark Ross and Francis Crozier, commanders of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror. (This was only eight years after the first such observatory was established in Gottingen by C.F. Gauss.) Lieutenant Kay was the director of the
    Rossbank observatory. Regular magnetic observations continued there until the end of 1854.

    By the initiative of Dr. Georg Neumayer an observatory was established in Melbourne in 1858 by the Government of Victoria, thereby beginning one of the longest continuous series of magnetic observations in the world. The original site of the Melbourne observatory was in the Flagstaff Gardens but it was moved in 1862 to the Botanical Gardens, the geologically more suitable site originally chosen by Neumayer. The subsequent encroachment of electric tramways and railways forced the move in 1919 to Toolangi some 60km to the north-east of Melbourne. The Toolangi observatory operated until early 1986. Absolute control of the variometers at Toolangi ceased at the end of June 1979 after which mean magnetic values were no longer reported. Rapid variation phenomena ceased to be reported after 1981 and K-indices ceased to be scaled after September 1984. The vario- meters at Toolangi were finally dismantled in February 1986.

    Having been established in 1978, the Canberra Magnetic Observatory gradually replaced Toolangi as the principal magnetic observatory in the south-eastern Australian region. The reporting of mean values began in 1979, the reporting of K-indices began in 1981, and the reporting of rapid variation phenomena began in 1982. Canberra is approximately 420km to the north-east of Toolangi.
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    College Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:28
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for theFairbanks Magnetic Observatory in Alaska. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 471 time(s); is stored in: 1 basket(s); 0 replies

    Chambon la Foret Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:27
    Continuous observations began at St Maur observatory in 1883. The observatory was moved to Val Joyeux in 1901, then to Chambon la Foret in 1936.

    The first variometers in Chambon la Foret observatory were a Mascart and a La Cour. The VFO31 fluxgate variometer was installed in 1978. The TSA fluxgate variometer was introduced in 1994, the GEOMAG M390 fluxgate magnetometer in 1995, and the IPGP VM391 fluxgate magnetometer in 2004.
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    Cambridge Bay Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:26
    Owing to the effects of the large induction anomaly at Alert, a decision was made to reduce the magnetic program at Alert in 1972. It was initially planned to replace Alert with an observatory at Eureka (80 deg. N. 85 deg. 56 min. W). However, an analysis of magnetic survey results from 1960 to 1962 showed that the effects of the Alert anomaly were significant at least as far south as Eureka. As the next stage in selection of a suitable site, a recording fluxgate magnetometer was operated at Cambridge Bay for two months in the summer of 1968. No unusual effects were observed in these recordings. In addition, Cambridge Bay is situated under the magnetospheric cleft region, and was expected to provide valuable data for magnetospheric studies.

    A preliminary site selection was made from an air photo of the area in consultation with officers of the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. Consequently, a 90,000 sq. m area, 180 m north of the coast and 15 km east of the village, was selected. The site is one of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks of Ordovician and Silurian age. A total force survey of the proposed site was made in September, 1971. Readings were taken at intervals of 30 m along two lines in the east-west and north-south directions. Gradients were 1.5 nT in 10 m to the north and 3 nT in 10 m to the south of the proposed building site. Soil borings taken earlier had confirmed that the site was suitable fora building as no permafrost had been found. The lack of permafrost is attributable to the location of the site which is on top of a 17 m gravel hill.

    The building was completed in December, 1971. It is of the same construction as the ones in Resolute Bay, N. W. T. and Baker Lake, N.W.T.

    Recordings of the geomagnetic field commenced with the installation of an AMOS Mk I in April, 1972. The aging AMOS MK I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III in March, 1982. In turn the AMOS Mk III was replaced by the INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS in the first week of 1992.

    CANMOS (Canadian Magnetic Observatory System) has been designed by the GSC Geomagnetism Program staff, who have developed the software to control the magnetometers and to process the basic digital data. CANMOS includes:
    - a commercial tri-axial ringcore fluxgate magnetometer, mounted on a tilt correcting suspension (of GSC design);
    - an Overhauser Proton Precession Magnetometer;
    - a bus-clock for timing control;
    - various storage media;
    - RS-232 outputs for 1 second, 5 second and 1 minute data streams.
    The AMOS MK I and III were instruments designed and manufactured by the then Dominion Observatory and Earth
    Physics Branch. These instruments differ significantly from a commercial version which was also named AMOS.
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    Bay St. Louis Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:24
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Bay St. Louis Magnetic Observatory in Mississippi. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
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    Barrow Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:23
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Barrow Magnetic Observatory in Alaska. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 460 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Borok Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:21
    Borok Geophysical Observatory was organized by the Schmidt's Institute of Physics of the Earth in 1957 under the International Geophysical Year program, as a central station of a mid latitude region on observation of ULF geomagnetic field pulsations. (http://geodata.borok.ru; http://geobrk:1352).

    The magnetic observatory of Institute of Terrestrial, Magnetism Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN)
    were operated in the Borok Geophysical Observatory since 1976 up to 2001. Geomagnetic field were measured
    by the three component Bobrov's type magnetometer, using data recording on photosensitive paper. Since 1998 the geomagnetic field variations are observed by the three component fluxgate magnetometer of the magnetometric station of the SAMNET, operating in the UK, Faroe Islands, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia.

    In April 2004 a new equipment was installed in Borok, matching the INTERMAGNET specifications.

    BOX observatory is run by the staff of the Geophysical Observatory. One-minute values are processed by IPGP.
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    Boulder Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:20
    These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for the Boulder Magnetic Observatory in Colorado. Vector values are measured using 3 mutually orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer sensors. The scalar value of the total magnetic field is recorded with a proton precession magnetometer. All values are calibrated with measurements of the absolute value of the geomagnetic field using a DI-Flux magnetometer. The data are numerically filtered to prevent aliasing, and quality controlled during processing. Longer period values of the field, including hourly, daily, monthly, and annual means are derived from the 1-minute data.
    was viewed: 633 time(s); is stored in: 1 basket(s); 0 replies

    Bangui Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:19
    No absolute observations were performed in 2004. That's why no magnetic data were published on the 2004 INTERMAGNET CD-ROM. Absolute measurements restarted beginning of May 2005. But there is a unexplained scalar F discontinuity between 2003 and 2005 estimated close to 10 nT. Mid-may 2005, a jump
    of around 1'30'' occured on D component. Consequently, our monthly binary CD-ROM files do not
    include January to May. Also no yearly means are published.

    Continuous observations began at Bangui in 1955. The GEOMAG M390 vector fluxgate magnetometer and
    the GEOMAG SM90 scalar magnetometer were installed in 1995.

    Absolute measurements are done every working days.
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    Chinese Academy of Sciences Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:17
    Digital recording of one-minute geomagnetic data started from November 1991(Sampling is 6 second) Absolute measurement be made twice a week using CTM-DI and G856. We ajusted the instrument on August 19, so the baseline value jumped after this day. We add a constant to baseline value. constants are as follow: H+45.2 nT, D+14.8 min, Z+10.1 nT
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    Baker Lake Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:16
    A program of geomagnetic field observations was begun in Baker Lake in 1947. Continuous photographic recording of the geomagnetic field variations using standard LaCour variometers began in January, 1951. Digital recordings began with the Earth Physics Branch's AMOS Mk I in November, 1971. The aging AMOS Mk I was replaced by the AMOS Mk III towards the end of November, 1981. In turn, the AMOS Mk III was replaced by the INTERMAGNET compliant CANMOS in April, 1991.
    was viewed: 542 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Brorfelde Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:15
    The Brorfelde magnetic Observatory is placed on Galindez island in West Antarctica Academik Vernadsky station, former Faraday station, UK). The magnetic field variations have been recorded since 1957 by La Cour magnetograph. Since 1980 Fluxgate EDA magnetometer have been used for the digital record. Now the digital recording with two LEMI 008 magnetometers by XYZ and HDZ orientation respectively is being carried out.
    was viewed: 491 time(s); is stored in: 1 basket(s); 0 replies

    Belsk Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:14
    The Belsk magnetic Observatory is placed on Galindez island in West Antarctica Academik Vernadsky station, former Faraday station, UK). The magnetic field variations have been recorded since 1957 by La Cour magnetograph. Since 1980 Fluxgate EDA magnetometer have been used for the digital record. Now the digital recording with two LEMI 008 magnetometers by XYZ and HDZ orientation respectively is being carried out.
    was viewed: 516 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Budkov Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:12
    Contact institute
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    Alice Springs Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:11
    The earliest vector magnetic observation at Alice Springs was probably made by the Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) in 1912 when the declination, inclination and horizontal intensity were measured at a location in the vicinity of the Alice Springs telegraph station just north of the town of Alice Springs. The location of that observing site has since been designated as magnetic station A. The declination was also measured at a nearby secondary station, later named A1. The exact location of A1 was not occupied again, but a close reoccupation was made in 1937 at a station referred to as A2. The next occupation occurred in 1945 when an exact reoccupation of station A2 from 1937 was made and a new station, B, was established.

    By the time of the next occupation, in 1954, the old telegraph station had been converted to a 'native mission site' and the buildings used in the original station descriptions were no longer identifiable. The azimuth marks described from the 1945 occupation could not be located, although the 1945 station marker (a peg) was located, but it had been torn out of the ground during road making operations. The general area of the stations had become magnetically contaminated by a barbed wire fence so the decision was taken to establish a new station at an alternate location. Two sites for a magnetic station were chosen, one at the airfield and one at the Department of Civil Aviation (DCA) transmission site. At the time, the station at the airfield was considered the better of the two, but fears of future magnetic contamination of the station were held. The station at the airfield was called C and that at the DCA transmitter site called station D. Both stations were marked with a concrete peg set one inch above ground level.

    Stations C and D were reoccupied in 1961, 1962, 1966 and 1969. In 1969 a new station was established at the airfield and designated station E. Station E was reoccupied in 1973, 1976, 1978 and 1983 (together with observations on station C). A secondary station was established close to station E in April 1983 by surveyors from the Australian Survey Office. The secondary station was designated as station F. Stations C, E and F were occupied in 1986 and 1992. Stations E and F were occupied in 2001, 2004 and again in 2005.

    Planning for the construction of the Alice Springs observatory was underway by 1984. After negotiations with the CSIRO Division of Wildlife and Range Lands Research, it was agreed that a magnetic observatory comprising two small underground vaults, a small building for control equipment, an observation pier with shelter and two azimuth pillars, could be constructed on the compound at their Central Australian Laboratory just south of the town of Alice Springs.

    The observatory was constructed in two stages. The first stage, comprising two small vaults and an absolute shelter, was completed in April 1988. The second stage, comprising the recording house and two azimuth reference pillars, was completed in June 1989. Electrical fixtures included in the recording house were an airconditioner, 2 x 40 watt fluorescent lights, two pairs of standard electrical outlets on each internal wall and provision for two telephone lines. The two azimuth piers were enclosed in cattle-proof fences.

    The position of the absolute pier and the azimuths from the absolute pier to the two reference pillars was surveyed in March 1990. The variometer and recording equipment were installed at the observatory in May 1992 and continuous recording of the magnetic field commenced on 01 June 1992.
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    Ascension Island Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:10
    Contact institute
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    L'AQUILA Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:08
    For additional information and references see the yearbooks for the observatory, 1960 - 2005

    All reported values are observatory standard and differ from IMS. Corrections to IMS:
    H: -6.0 nT; D: +0.0'; Z: -21.0 nT; F: -21.0 nT
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    Amsterdam Island Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:07
    The Amsterdam island (60km2) is a volcano related to an active transform fault. Lavas are tholeiitic in composition and are likely to originate from a shallow mantellic source. The permanent base Martin de Vivies was set up in 1950 in the north part of the island. At the beginning, it was dedicated to meteorological observations. The permanent magnetic observatory (IAGA code AMS) was established in 1981 by the formerly Ecole et Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg (now Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre).

    The site selected to build up the observatory (altitude 50 meters) is located 50 meters above the sea level, on a slightly dipping plateau composed of solidified lava flows and tunnels. The observatory comprises two huts: an absolute hut and a variometer hut, installed between December 1980 and April 1981, about hundred meters away from the other buildings of the base. The variometer hut is located 15 meters NW with respect to the absolute hut. The recording laboratory is 120 meters NW away from the absolute hut. Since the opening of the observatory in April 1981, the infrastructures have remained unchanged.

    The magnetic chart of the hut surroundings displays large local magnetic anomalies originating from the strongly magnetized basalt basement outcropping all over the island. The variation of the total field intensity between the absolute pier and the variometer pier reaches 400 nT.

    Digital one minute data have been recorded continuously since 1981. An equipment for the INTERMAGNET program was added in December 1992. It consists in a data collection plateform (DCP) for transmission via METEOSAT satellite to European Gin's.
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    Argentine Islands Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:05
    The Argentine Islands magnetic Observatory is placed on Galindez island in West Antarctica Academik Vernadsky station, former Faraday station, UK). The magnetic field variations have been recorded since 1957 by La Cour magnetograph. Since 1980 Fluxgate EDA magnetometer have been used for the digital record. Now the digital recording with two LEMI 008 magnetometers by XYZ and HDZ orientation respectively is being carried out.
    was viewed: 1363 time(s); is stored in: 0 basket(s); 0 replies

    Abisko Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:04
    Contact institute
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    Alibag Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:03
    The first regular magnetic observatory in the country was Colaba observatory which was located in Bombay (now renamed as Mumbai) and was built in 1826 for astronomical observations and time-keeping. This 175 year old building now serves as office space for the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism. Geomagnetic and meteorological measurements were started here in 1841 by Arthur Bedford Orlebar. The new photographic drum method came to Colaba in 1871 and ensured continuous recording of the geomagnetic elements,and rapidly gained use all over the world.

    The existence of Colaba observatory came under a threat, when a decision was taken to introduce electric trams for public transport. A new observatory was established at Alibag which was located about 30 km to the south-east of Mumbai in 1904, thereby continuing further recordings at this place and the recordings at Colaba were then discontinued.The uninterrupted collection of magnetic data at Colaba and its successor at Alibag constitutes one of the longest series anywhere in the world.

    The Alibag magnetic observatory is operated under the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, a National Autonomous Research Institute with the Department of Science and Technolgy, India. The Institute also operates a chain of magnetic observatories extending from magnetic equator at about 8deg N to the proximity of the focal latitude of Sq focus at 35deg N in the Indian longitude zone to give an extensive coverage of the country.
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    Addis Ababa Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:52:01
    The Magnetic Observatory of Addis Ababa was established with the advent of IGY and has been operating since January 1958.
    The observatory is located in town, on the AAU grounds. The underground is made of basalt. In August 1997, the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris
    (IPGP) installed a new magnetic station in Addis Ababa as part of its network "Observatoire Magnetique Planetaire". In July 1999 the triaxial sensor and the data acquisition
    system were out of order. Due to custom problems and technical difficulties the station restarted beginning of 2001 (no record between July 1999 and February 2001). In August 2004, a new vector magnetometer VM391 was installed.

    In mid-August 2005, the observatory was striken down by ligthning. The magnetic monitoring was set in again at the end of August 2005.

    This equipment is operated by the staff of Geophysical Observatory of AAU. One-minute values are processed by IPGP.
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    Alma-Ata Magnetic Observatory Added: 2008-09-23T07:51:59
    Contact institute
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